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night but because of the lateness of the hour many people didn't see it. it is about america's future, not with standing who the president is. joining me are tom brocaw, ally gutmann, david brooks and jon meacham. >> they have to taker it out of oluma a say some seizure are right and some of the issues on education and inequity are right and i'm going to take it out of both sides and that will just confuse everybody. but more people in the country between the tweeting and blogging would say interesting. >> rose: america and its future, the america moment when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> right here at home. >> that future is out there waiting for us. >> ro: a policihks of the next election, a statesman of the next gentlemen of the jury race said the theologian james clerk and you can't govern in poetry or pros. we want to raise this question. where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth and where is it going, the challenge of the next administration to both immediate and deep. no great country sustained its position without a strong economic founda
to do, i tell people if you want to be an optimist about america, stand on your head because the country looks so much better from the bottom up than it the does from the studio david and i are in overlooking washington, d.c. it's still exploding wth enrepreursp and i think that one of the things that the next president has to do is really convey excitement about that and literally sit down with everyone in the business from one end to the other and say what are the things we have to do to amplify it, to take it to scale. because the days when someone is going to come to your town with a 25,000 person factory, that's over. ford will come, but it may be with a 2, 500 person robot factory so we need 50 people starting jobs for 20, 20 people starting jobs for 30, 30 people starting jbs for 50. that's what we need and we need it at scale. >scale. >> rose: a new president faces for his country a diminished role for america or what? >> i want to go back to your opening, charlie and something jon meacham said which i certainly believe but the american dream is at stake. we have to pass on a ris
to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> i have no evidence at this point, from what i've seen, the classified information was disclosed. >> this week on "inside washington," a sex scandal at the top of the cia. the benghazi blame game. >> the american people deserve to know the facts. we cannot ever let this happen again. >> why would susan rice not get our vote? i don't trust her. >> defending susan rice. >> senator mccain and senator graham want to go after some big, they should go after me. >> there are no barriers, they to sitting down and working through this process. >> as the fiscal cliff limbs, is there a deal in the works? mitt romney explains why he lost . >> the president's campaign was focused on his base coalition, giving extraordinary gifts from the government, working aggressively to turn them out to vote. captioned by the national captioning institute --w
. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. it's the weekend after, and barack obama is back in the white house, democrats are back in control of the senate, and republicans are back running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 a
as a liberal-to-moderate politician. he opposed newt gingrich's "contract with america." he supported abortion rights. he said he was to the left of ted kennedy on gay rights. >> the expectation was that romney would do very well. >> mitt romney, the republican candidate... >> i ran into someone who was not so friendly to us who said, "did you come to see your guy destroyed?" i paced in the back of faneuil hall during the entire debate. >> good evening and welcome. >> narrator: romney directly confronted edward kennedy. >> senator kennedy, my impression has been that you have followed a campaign, as soon as the primary was over, of trying to divert the voters' attention from the issues at hand, and instead making personal attacks on me which are unfounded, unfair and sleazy. >> narrator: kennedy had unleashed negative tv ads. >> romney. it's not just what he did to his workers and business that's the problem. it's what he might do to us in the senate. >> kennedy was a master politician and what he did was he used a series of filmed ads to its maximal effect. >> mitt romney says he helped creat
's economic relationship with america, and american investors. >> reporter: i'm sylvia hall in washington- still ahead, u.s. borrowers owe more than $1 trillion in student loan debt. so could helping them pay it down be a $1 trillion industry? i'll introduce you to some entrepreneurs who think so. >> susie: besides the fiscal cliff, investors and traders on wall street were talking about some merger news today. leucadia national is buying jefferies group. it already owns 28% of the investment firm. the $3.6 billion deal, could help jeffees sh to the lucrative mergers advisory business. leucadia is a conglomerate with a wide range of businesses from beef processing to timber. also today, sherwin williams is buying consorcio comex, it's a mexican coatings business. the price: $2.3 billion. >> susie: the united states will be the top oil producer in the world by the year 2020, surpassing saudi arabia, and russia. that's the bold call today from the international energy agency. fueling that energy renaissance: a boost in oil and shale gas because of new technologies like fracking. the group a
by takezo obata, born in a farming village in hiroshima. he moved to america at the age of 17 to start a new life. overcoming hurdles such as prejudice, he worked hard in orchards and stock farms and became a successful rancher. but in 1942, after america entered world war ii, he was among those sent to internment camps. his farm and livestock were confiscated. obata lost everything he had worked to build for 40 years. he began channelling his energy into making art. he fashioned the rattlesnake from a mesquite branch he found. many internees have recalled how his fortitude and endurance helped keep them going. >> it's a reflection of himself, right. so it would be strength of his own personality or of a human being in general. >> reporter: most of the pieces in the exhibition had never been put on show until recently. >> this one is a mockingbird. >> reporter: they were gathered by delphine, a third-generation japanese-american. she was prompted to do this after coming across a small wooden proof while organizing her mother's mementos. her mothered a rarely talked to her about the internmen
.e. and bank of america. it all leads up to friday when the president sits down with congressional leaders at the white house to begin the real negotiations, and both sides enter those talks claiming a mandate to protect the principals the voters endorsed at the ballot box. >> darren gersh is with us tonight from our washington, d.c. bureau, where a week after election day here. was there any progress made by the staffs of the political players during the campaign season? where do we stand? >> the staff is always looking at this as a giant chess game and trying to figure out how they can give their bosses their best move, so the staff have been working. we had a lot of commissions and a lot of efforts to try to solve the budget problems. there is a lot of work de behind the scenes and on paper. a deal could come together pretty quickly. the problem is the principals, the leaders, the people who were elected, they have to come back and decide what they're going to do. they're talking about getting an agreement, but nobody knows how to get that agreement right now. >> tom: it pays to parse l
of a recovery home prices went up in most major u.s. cities by 3% in september compared to a year ago. america's ambassador to the u.n. failed to mollify senate critics today on the attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice met with republican senators who've criticized her for saying-- five days after the attack-- that anti-american protests were to blame. in fact, u.s. officials already knew it was a terrorist strike. today, rice blamed faulty intelligence. but senator lindsey graham said he was unimpressed. bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explation about how four americans died in benghazi libya by ambassador rice i think does not do justice to the reality at the time and in hindsight clearly was completely wrong. >> sreenivasan: graham, along with senators mccain and ayotte, have said they'll oppose rice if she's nominated to be secretary of state. but independent senator joe lieberman also met with rice today, and he said he was satisfied with her explanation of events. >> i found her statements to be significant. she was just
a little thing to think about that. if you could get everybody in america to pay you one penny a day. at the end of the year you'd have $1.1 billion. if you can get a dime you're going to have $11 billion at the end of the year. if you can get a dollar you can have over $100 billion. >> reporter: this is finally how we're going to be able to support the "newshour," we'll get each of you to send a penny and... >> but that's the trick, you've got figure out how to get everybody to give you that penny and the best way to do it is if you're already billing them, you find ways to stick in all these extra little charges. >> reporter: it didn't always used to be this way. here, for example is a scranton, pennsylvania electric bill from 1937, back when public utilities were strictly regulated. >> it's a very simple bill, it's not even a full page of paper, and it has the account number, the dates that are covered, the meter reading, this person used three kilowatts per hour of electricity, and the price written down here at the bottom. >> reporter: today's bill, by contrast-- this one from p
offered by many of those who came before him. >> that america can change. our union can be perfected. >> many americans have grown tired of what their country had come to represent under george w. bush. obama promised change at home and abroad. he brought an end to the war in iraq. he said u.s. combat forces would pull out of afghanistan by the end of 2014. and he promised to decimate al qaeda. >> after a fire fight they killed osama bin laden and took custody of his body. we can say to those families who have lost loved ones to al qaeda's terror, justice has been done. >> but some argue obama has not met expectations in the middle east. he's faced persistent trouble with a dominant player in the region, iran. he has focused foreign policy to make it more multilateral, part of what he calls a broader shift. aft a dade in whi we fought two wars that cost us dearly, in blood and treasure, the united states is turning our attention to the vast potential of the asia-pacific region. >> reporter: obama turned his attention at home to pushing through health care reform, something president
, proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> we are going to die. we are going to freeze. >> this week on "inside washington," sandy's brutal october surprised. >> i want to thank the president personally. >> how many votes are these photographs worth? how do you compete with the natural disaster? climate change? neither candidate wants to go near its. the new unemployment number -- how will it play in the polling place? jeep jobs in china flap. >> sold chrysler to italians who are going to build jeeps in china. >> an outrageous lie. captioned by the national captioning institute >> we thought this is going to be a special preelection broadcast, that all we would have to do is handicapped the election. then along came hurricane sandy. in politics, a wise man told me once that you can never see around t corner. i don't want to minimize the
hearts that for the united states of america, the best is yet to come. >> this week, the post-election rubio. >> i still wish i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. >> and where do we go from here? >> mr. president, we stand ready to work with you. >> the republicans take a look at their game plan. >> i think republicans have done a lousy job of reaching out to people of color. >> an amazing campaign. let me be clear. i did not bill that. you build that. >> also a look at ballot initiatives, including legalizing pot. >> this is the best day of my life. captioned by the national captioning institute >> it was a long, anxious night for a lot of people in this town and across the nion,ut then the networks called ohio and you knew it was over. the president won 93% of african-americans, a 71% of hispanics, more women than romney. he won 52% of voters under 34. half the independent voters. 54% of those who make over $100,000 a year. first we will hear from the president. >> i believe we can lead this future together be
. a type of natural gas trapped in under ground rock. america relies on it for 20% of import needs. now let's get a check on the markets. the yen is losing ground slightly against the dollar and the euro. dollar/yen is changing hands at 79.57 and the euro/yen is quoted at 100.99 to 104. debt stricken greece could get bail out funds. share prices are rising slightly in tokyo. this morning the index stands at 8,695. that's up about two-tenths of a percent. the index fell six days in a row. investors are now buying back mainly export related issues. >>> other markets in special regions. the kospi is down about.14%. the people who will made japanese money, the operators of the national mint are pitching their services to overseas government. the first customer looks like being bangladesh. officials are expecting to receive the order soon for 500 million bangladesh's coins. they are made of stainless steel and worth about three cents. other bidders included britain and germany. japan's mint has produced coins in the past but this will be the first time to mint a foreign common currency. producti
niro. that's the way it is in the east coast of america if you're italian. that's just what happens. >> rose: how did the friendship develop? >> we got to be friendsbecause of "limitless." we met when we were on one of the juries in tribeca and we talked about "limitless." we met and talked about doing it -- >> and if i could just say one thing. this is what's great about him. i put myself on tape to play his son in the movie. >> rose: oh, i remember this. >> but, you know, you took the time knowing that i wasn't going to get it, sam rockwell may have been already cast. he took the time to say to brian "hey, that kid who made that tape, let me meet him in between 700 things. lete take fi minutes and say to him stay on track." >> rose: you're not going to get the role. but i see something. >> i see something and he gave me a hug. for an actor trying to make his way, i mean, that is like gold. better. it's better. >> rose: roll tape. here's another scene in the relationship between the two of you. >> how are you doing, mr. de niro, my name is bradley cooper. my question is regardings
of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by including more companies in its survey. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the economic signals out today point in the same direction-- an economy that has moved through a rough couple of months last spring has now found stability. >> slow growth need not be fragile, so we are in a moderate growth phase that appears to be quite durable. it's going to be hard to break out significantly in one direction or the other, unless we get a policy surprise or a policy mistake. >> reporter: the adp payroll snapshot is seen as a kind of preview for the government's official employment report, which comes out tomorrow. factoring in job losses in state and local government, adp projects the labor department will likely say the economy created roughly 130,000 jo
, but still latin america, but they have different ideas about how to deal with the imgriggs issue. governor romney and the self deportation situation has not necessarily found a significant audience even in south florida. nonetheless as the latest poll shows, he has been gaining some strength with voters in north and central florida. >> susan: thanks, tom. we'll catch up with you later in the program. virginia is another crucial state, and will be one of the first swing states to tally election results tonight. polls close at 7:00 p.m. eastern time, and the race looks close, a mirror of the national race. darren gersh joins us from virginia. darren. >> reporter: susie, we're here in woodbridge, virginia, which is considered a swing area in a key swing state. and it's a state that also surprised the candidates this election. after the voting here is over, you'll be hearing a lot more about the fiscal cliff, those automatic spending cuts and tax increases scheduled to take effect on january 1. you'd think the fiscal cliff would be a huge issue here. virginia depends heavily on defense spendin
about any new view of about any new view@of jesus in america. we'll ask the author of american stephen broth row with another view on the live line. captions produced by visual audio captioning barack obama barac barack obama barack obama >> dr. stephen prothero, welcome. your book has a central proposition, what is the proposition in the book? >> i think there's two. one is that jesus is many and mal oohable, there isn't just one jesus but there's many and the other is that jesus isn't just for christians in the ited states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 rigious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without anyt all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your bo
to state the obvious, when he first sprang on natial attention with the "we're not red america, we're not blue america, we're not white, we're not black" that's been eviscerated. we clearly have an electorate that's divided in long term structural ways along racial lines. >> and regional lines. >> and the goal of either party would be -- and gender lines and the goal of either party would be to change that. >> rose: an election preview when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight we enter the final hours of 2012's presidential election. tuesday may be the main event but tens of millions have already voted. reduction of early voting hours in key states have raised questions about the propriety of campaign tactics. both sides are preparing for possible legal challenges in a sign that the contest might continue beyond election day. president barack obama and governor romney have spent the day drumming up last-minute support in battleground states. >> you may be frustrated at the pace of change.
'm concerned about america. this election is over but our principles endure. that i believe the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the ield we have given all our to this campaign. (cheers and applause) i so wish -- i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader so ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation. >> rose: the race revealed america's shifting fault lines. it was a national conversation carried out in a few battleground states. billions of dollars poured into theampan as both sides sought to define the other as responsible for the country's economic and partisan gridlock. but when it became clear that the long race had ended, both candidates spoke of the need for moving past division. here is what the president said. >> and in the coming weeks and months i am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both partie
the problem with this is that when you look around coastal america, at the cities and communities that are vulnerable to predicted levels of sea rise, the expense is just astronomical. there may be political will to keep manhattan protected. but the federal scale of the policy problem really just isn't suited to political action. the numbers are too big and the time lines are too long for politicians. >> rose: what would you add to that. >> i think what steve is saying is exactly right, and unfortunately, our instinct which is an understandable human instinct is immediately to rebuild, rbui the jrsey shore, rebuild where we've been. part of the problem we haven't come to terms with is people are not going to be able to live at sea level along these coasts the way they have in the most. and if we're going to have a city at sea level like southern manhattan, we're going to have to protect it with walls. whatever you think about climate change, the weather is changing, we're going to have more of these events. >> rose: the cause is changing. >> exactly. it is changing and these eve
, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's ar. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> intel >> support also comes from carnegie co
rabbis and cantors across the nation are hoping to raise awareness of hunger in america. as part of the third annual jewish community food stamp challenge, they have agreed to try to live on no more than $31.50. that's a week. that's the average sum a person in need receives through the federal food stamp program. rabbi lenny gordon is one of those undertaking the challenge. we joined him as he began his week at mishkan tefila synagogue in chestnut hill, massachusetts. >> i am doing the food stamp challenge, and many of my colleagues are doing it during this week before thanksgiving. and i am sure that this will inform our teaching to our communities, our community thanksgiving events, and our thanksgiving meals. starting off my own personal food stamp challenge with a day with our teenagers is actually very important for me. we're going to do a little menu planning and shopping trip planning before we go to sort of think about what we are going to be looking for, and then to go out there and price it and try as we're going through, creating what essentially will be for me my wee
. robert? >> well, there are some rough spots out here, actually, across the americas that we're continuing to watch. first, let's look at the dakotas where a storm system is moving through here. you could be seeing 10 centimeter of accumulation coming down here. of snow. with that same system, we have a cold front stretching across the ohio, ev into the mississippi river vall. that will be bringing rain showers for you. thunderstorm activity going through your thursday. but the rest of the americas looks rather dry. on friday, though, we are watching a storm system moving into the pacific northwest, already affecting british columbia here with some gusty winds, even heavy rains. that's expected to track off here towards the east. take a look at the sunny sky down there toward the southwest, along the east coast, plan on enjoying your thursday and getting out there for autumn weather. well, it does look like it's going to be rather decent. but let's talk about those temperatures. because this cold front ll be dropping things down drastically. in the central plains. minneapolis, 13 here on y
. >> we're in small town america. and it's not like we're in the beltway where if you lose this job, you can go to another job. there's another opportunity, you don't have that here. so anyone in the defense industry that's in small town america, is going to have a huge impact. >> reporter: so while all these cuts are one way to help washington get its fiscal house in order, c.e.o. bill polacek says it would take a massive, preventable and personal toll here in johnstown. >> everything i've worked for, everything everybody worked for, in 25 years of business that we're celebrating this year, could all be for naught, only because the people in congress, and the senate, can't vote to do what's in the best interest of the american people. >> reporter: congress has until january first to avert the sequester. until then, manufacturers, researchers, teachers and a host of others will be waiting to find out if and how the fiscal cliff will affect them. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: we've seen the estimates on going over the cliff, recession, some even calling it debt-mageddon. but
states of america pays its bills and does not default for the first time in its history, is deeply irresponsible. >> reporter: at least talks are going on. the speaker and the president spoke by phone for almost half an hour last night. but a first negotiating round between treasury secretary timothy geithner and congressional leaders did nothing to improve the tone on capitol hill. democrats said the ball was in the speaker's court. >> we're saying, extend the tax cuts for the middle class as part of that. we know if we do nothing, the top rates go up. we're waiting for the republicans to come forward with something. that's our proposal, period. >> reporter: no one in washington ever thought negotiations to get past the fiscal cliff would be easy. now, more and more are talking about a rerun of what happened with the tarp bailout bill. first, congress may have to deadlock and go over the cliff, and then count on a falling market and an angry public to force action. >> it's what's euphemistically bng called "let's let the peasants storm the castle with pitchforks" strategy. that is
for the incumbent. and certainly images of this president and perhaps the most famous governor in america, chris christie, a republican, side by sidewalking around the board walk on the jersey shore, that's what president obama could not have asked for for the final five days of this campaign judy. >> woodruff: margaret, what about these states? i looked again at this list of ateshe preside isoing to over the next several days. it's the same battleground states we've been focused on. we showed them there in the a.p. map of the states considered tossups. do they see movement in one state or another? and how do they read the romney going to pennsylvania, running ads in minnesota? >> sometimes when you go to a state that's a reach it's because you want to expand your win. they're not reading this that as what governor romney is doing in pennsylvania. as jonathan said, they're looking at it as governor romney looking for an alternate path to 270. don't forget, president obama is closer than he wants to be in a lot of places: colorado, nevada, nevada should have been tucked away a while ago. >> wisco
. and in green bay, ann romney talked up storm relief. >> this is a time for us to care --ll america-- to reacout and help others. >> hello, this is marley. i'm calling from organizing for america. >> reporter: of course, democratic volunteers were also working hard at their local office in another part of town. the president, in fact, has more than twice as many field offices in the state as romney more boots on the ground. and the competition for door- knocks and one-on-one contact here is intense. mary ginnebaugh is brown county democratic party chairman. >> we had a huge canvass the last two weekends, knocking on doors, talking with people. we have just been working really hard to identify the people that we know are sort of on that fence, haven't committed, maybe have voted republican in the past or have voted democratic in one election and republican another time. we see there's this ying yang sort of thing going on and were trying... >> reporter: ying yang? here in green bay? >> yeah, yeah. even here in green bay. right. >> reporter: in fact, this is the main reason for all this attention
looking here in the tropics. manila 33. here in the americas things r calm and dry. even toward central canada things are clearing out. also here in the pacific northwest a system will be moving in and that could add 30 centimeters. things will be tapering off and houston e, louisiana, 30s here. don't digits finally moving there. here in europe this system is going to be better. we're looking at very wet conditions into the next 24/48 too. the gusts are going to be very strong as well. here is the extended forecast. >>> our le sries this hour. israeli government has been pounded targets inside gaza. the flair up and fighting is raising concerns of a wider conduct similar to what happened in 2008. >>> riz ray lee forces have attack. hostilities started with an air triek. the military chief. at least 15 have dies in all, including children. ga rests are staying ng. >> reporter: in fact, it was a bad night for young and old people especially for children. >> hamas is ratcheting up its attacks. fighters law firmed more than 250 rockets in israel high pressure they allowed us in a suburb. ha
for beijing. 17 degrees in tokyo. that's about seven degrees higher than yesterday. moving into the americas. thanksgiving day, u.s. thanksgiving day is coming up thursday. it's going to be the busy week for you. drivers may run into extremely dangerous traveling conditions for the northwest as a new system moving in from the pacific. right now we're looking hefty showers along the coast from northern californi up into british columbia. you may see as much as 160 millimeters of rain in the next 24 hours. it's more than the monthly rainfall for november. the lines are very close to each other meaning winds are blowing. as the system moves forward the east heavy snow is going to be a very big problem. 50 centimeters of snow is possible. that's going to be accompanied by very strong winds. gusts could hit 100 kilometers per how. coasl ra cld lead to flash flood along the coast. as for the continent dry and relatively warm conditions will continue throughout the thanksgiving week. temperatures on your tuesday. 22 degrees in oklahoma city. 25 in houston. temperatures are remaining on the seasonal
on something that's far worse than what we saw in latin america. >> reporter: in the 1980s or '90s you mean. >> yeah, i mean i lived in latin america, i saw it and i was part of the workout. this is worse. >> reporter: does lee buchheit then... >> have a lot of work? ( laughter ) >> reporter: yeah, i'm sure he has a lot of work, but does he bear a lot of the blame? >> no, no. i mean he's just reacting to the situation that's evolving. but i think there's a lot of concern that, if you have this legal coaching on how to really gut creditor rights, that you may actually end up in a situion ere nobodyantsto lend to countries. >> reporter: but if that's already a clear and present danger, we wondered why not just stiff the creditors? after all the history of sovereign debt is default, default, default, default over centuries and then those same countries come back into the market sometimes in just a few years and can start borrowing again. >> excessively brutal behavior by the sovereign debtor will be remembered and subsequent administrations will pay a penalty. they will pay a higher interest r
're scared about america's fiscal cliff, as well as europe's financial crisis. but market pros say, seasonally, this is a great time to wade back in. >> november, december, january is the best three-month period in the stock market. these are your best gains, historically. so if we don't see investors' demand coming in soon, when's it going to happen? >> reporter: others say it's going to happen when investors get the message about the importance of equities in their portfolio. >> to get them back into the market over the next 12 to 24 months, we think lots of educati, but from different kinds of people-- you're advisor, if you have one. if you don't have an advisor, it would be good to hear that message from your employer. >> reporter: financial planners believe once the fiscal cliff problem is solved, we'll probably get a relief rally in the stock market. they predict that run-up will be a magnet for reluctant retail investors. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: to learn more about investors and presidential elections, head to there you'll find more on historical chan
to fill a total of 24 million seats between today and sunday, according to airlines for america. that's an average of 2.5 million seats filled each day, up by a quarter of a million from last year. >> this year so far, the average profit point for every passenger is about $.50, which is awfully small. last year it was $.77. >> reporter: the holiday season is a welcome event in the industry's fourth quarter. >> historically, the fourth quarter was at best a break even quarter, but due to the airlines better management of their seat inventory, they can actually produce a profit during the fourth quarter, which i'm expecting. >> reporter: in recent years, industry representatives say airlines have struggled to survive, as their ticket sales failed to cover the volatile cost of fuel and their increased regulatory and tax burdens. to combat the problem, they have started selling fewer tickets to keep capacity down and control costs. >> we're finding that more people still want to fly and unfortunately it means that planes are going to be a little more full than we'd like them to be but at
america president mark reuss at the los angeles auto show. g.m. unveiled its first all- electric plug-in at the show, and, as diane eastabrook tonight, the company hopes the spark can give the electric vehicle business the jolt it needs. >> reporter: the chevrolet spark e.v. will hit showrooms in california and oregon next summer. engineers are still testing the pure plug-in so general motors can't say yet how many miles the sub-compact will get on a single charge. what it can say is new technology will allow for faster charging. the spark won't be cheap. with tax incentives, the car's sticker price will be about $25,000, double the price of the gas-powered version. >> when you look at the functionality that this vehicle has and the range we offer-- which we believe is the top of its segment-- it is going to be extremely competitive from a price perspective. you're always going to pay more for an electric vehicle than you would for a traditional vehicle with a gas engine. >> reporter: general motors has placed a huge bet on electric vehicles, hoping they'll help the company reach the
begin with the question that haunts our time -- why in a nation as rich as america, has the economy stopped working for people at-large even as those at the top enjoy massive rewards? the struggle of ordinary people for a decent living, for security, is as old as the republic, but it's taken on a new and urgent edge. instead of shared prosperity, our political system has now produced a winner-take-all economy. >> how much is enough, gordon. >> hollywood saw it coming. >> the richest 1% of this country owns half of our country's wealth -- $5 trillion. one-third of that comes from hard work, two-thirds comes from inhetance. interest on interest accumulating to widows' idiot sons. and what i do -- stock the real estate speculation. it's [ bleep ] >> you got 90% of the american people have little or no net worth. i create nothing -- i own. we make the rules, pal. the news, war, peace, famine, upheaval -- the price of a paper clips. we pull the rabbit out of the hat while everybody else sits there wondering how in the [ bleep ] we did it. now, you're not my ev enough to think we're livin
for gerald ford. that's how republican in post goldwater america virginia had become. that clearly is not the virginia that we're looking at tonight. >> a very different state. ifill: let me ask mark and david about that question because i'm curious about what changed. what happened between 1976 that richard was just talking about and today that virginia is so different? it's just an influx of different kinds of people? younger people that ray was talking about? we saw wisconsin where the president had a huge rally with all those people in madison a couple of days ago and maybe that was a sign? are we seeing some sort of fundamental shift that virginia going to guide us on? >> northern virginia... you know, seven out of the ten richest counties in the country are the d.c. counties. it turns out if you send 25% or 30% of your g.d.p. to washington we keep a little. it goes into the extremely rich counties, fairfax county even down to prince williams county, louden county which we mentioned. these northern virginia counties are booming counties. a lot more population. a lot of people
to obama for america headquarters on chicago's lakefront and thanked his volunteers who had worked for him over the past year-plus. it was said to be a very moving and very emotional encounter between the president and the people who have made sure th he's going to be president for another four years. as kwame mentioned, he's spoken with all the leaders of the two branches of the legislature, and put on the agenda tax cuts for the middle class and small businesses, job creation, and says that the message from last night's election is that the people want them to put aside their partisan differences to work for the better interests of the american people. >> ifill: now, all those people at obama for america headquarters who have been working probably nonstop since 2008 to set up the infrastructure for this victory last night. how do they think-- what do they think won the election for them? >> suarez: they put together very carefully a coalition over time, and tonight david axelrod is saying it's very gratifying that that coalition came together, as kwame mentioned-- blacks, latinos, women,
also provides one third of america's children with the only health care they have. so there are many people to think about. i always think that the 535 people in congress who are going to make this decision, it's not really about them. it's about 360 million americans that need them to step up to a very tough issue, find a solution that works for all of americans, not just a few. >> brown: what should the stance otheresent. wha do you want the stance of the president to be coming out of this election? stick to some guns? compromise? where should he be? >> the president was really clear in this election that he was fighting to protect the middle class from more cuts and to do a deal that would get the economy moving again. what he said is he's going to stick to his guns on that. we think that's... our members who worked really hard and worked our guts out, were knocking on doors and making phone calls to elect the esidt, that's definitely what they think is needed. they've been fighting for two years to make sure we ultimately get, that we ask, you know, the wealthiest in this country
degrees in tokyo. rain will be dissipating. moving into the americas. this is where the jetstream is flowing and low pressure systems will move along this flow. first of all, we have a low west of british columbia. that will move into coastal areas. the coast mountain in british columbia will see as much as 30 centimeters of snow in the nt 24 hours. ahead of the system we have another low. snow as well as rain showers are likely. chicago will turn wet on your tuesday. we have a very powerful low pressure system over the south. this is bringing the risk of severe weather in south eastern texas and southern louisiana. even tornadoes cannot be ruled out. it's going to be moving along the eastern seaboard from tuesday evening into your thursday. that means the east coast where hurricane sandy devastated will be seeing another round of stormy conditions ahead of the middle part of the week. rain will start in atlanta on tuesday and washington, d.c. and new york city will see rain showers on your wednesday and even snow showers are possible overnight wednesday and thursday. on tuesday w
to be minus 8 degrees. meanwhile, warming up to 21 degrees in tokyo. all right, moving into the americas, then. in guatemala, a major earthquake occurred on wednesday morning local time. it looks like weather is cooperative. sunny skies will continue into thursday. out towards the east, a nor'easter strengthening over the east of the u.s. this is causing very strong north easterly winds and also very heavy cold precipitation in parts of the northeastern section of the u.s., as well as atlantic canada. as much as 15 to 30 centimeters of snow is likely in the high elevations in new england, and even lower-lying evations such as new york city, seeing the first snowfall of the season. as much as 7 centimeters likely overnight wednesday into thursday. out towards the west, things are going to change dramatically in the next 24 hours in the northwestern u.s. we are seeing blizzard-hike conditions. we're expecting blizzard-like conditions in the northern plains. i should say the northern rockies. winds and heavy rain are on the cards from thursday continuing into your friday. the sierras also will se
, what we need in america would have been a president that could push our economy forward and do what we need to do do get out of the economic crisis we have been in. you know, really, it's unfortunate when 2 million less people voted this time. >> even in the swing state of virginia, you had less evangelicals come out as they did for mccain in 2008. 6% to 8% stayed at home. >> you would hope we could cross the race and religion barrier. >> but let me ask you this -- granted, i thought the republican field from the beginning was incredibly weak. >> absolutely. >> but i saw republicans, once romney got the nomination, partisans gatheri around him and saying, oh, the mormon issue isn't going to matter. and it did matter. there are evangelicals who see mormons as a sect and not christian, and they did stay home. so my question is, in reforming the party, will republicans say to themselves, hey, wait a minute, we goofed up by not getting somebody more conservative and somebody christian who would appeal to evangelical christians. could they read the results that way? >> the right to life and
>>> new and improved? the pharmaceutical industry in america is constantly researching and innovating. this makes it possible for the industry to market new medicine, all the time. but new is not necessarily improved. so says a brand new study funded by the british government. the study found that older, cheaper, generic drugs were treating mental illness were better across-the-board than newly marketed medications. when it comes to prescription drugs, how can you tell when new really means improved? we'll ask dr. sharon levine. >>> new study i referred doctor sharon levine, from san francisco, associated executive director of kaiser permanenty. that new study refers to schizophrenia and the new drug it was found is better than the existing drug, right? >> yes, that's right this. is a very important studdy and it demonstrated in a large population that the older antipsychotic drug, heldol, was more affective than the newer category called a typical antipsychotics. d it really speaks to the fact that we have a buys, all of us, consumers, physicians, we assume that new me
's their expertise but they have to figure out the details and we need to resolve this subject and give america confidence that our political leaders can work together and i honestly believe that that will happen. >> reporter: when you reported third quarter results earlier this month you said you didn't have enough clarity on the impact of superstorm sandy. do you have more clarity now? >> i do have clarity on sandy and frankly it's devastating. particularly on individuals. we had 200 of our stores closed for the first three days of the november period and then many more were closed after that because we didn't have power. we definitely were impacted in a major way at our company. >> reporter: for the current quarter you expect to fall short of wall street forecasts by at least five cents. are you still comfortable with those expectations? >> we try to guide honestly and if we're able to exceed that number that's always good news. but we try to guide where we believe we're going to be so we're confident with our forecasts. >> reporter: terry thank you so much. >> thanks ruben. >> tom: while ma
. and that's expected to rise dramatically. people 85 and older are the fastest growing group in america, and census projections say their numbers will more than double, to 11.5 million, by the year 2035. >> author jane gross says it's a situation our entire society is unprepared to deal with. her own education began about a decade ago, when she and her brother needed to care for their ailing elderly mother. as a journalist for "the new york times," gross was used to getting information easily. but with this, she says she felt clueless on multiple fronts. >> medical, various entitlement programs like medicare and medicaid and how they work. residential, where was she going to live? legal, financial, those are the most obvious ones but they don't overlap and, you know, you can't make three phone calls and figure them all out. >> based on her experiences, gross started the "new old age blog," and wrote a book called "a bittersweet season: caring for our aging parents and ourselves." with so many people living longer, gross believes one of the biggest social questions is how to pay for thei
. moving over to the americas. still this low pressure system is being very well developed. it's going to furer intensify as it moves toward lower mississippi valley. it's already bringing thunder showers across this area but things could get on the severe side. main threats will be hail and damaging winds. tornadic activity cannot be ruled out. as it moves toward the northeast things will get very chilly with that fridgid air flowing in. precipitation will likely turn to white in new york. i know some hundreds of houses are still out of power due to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. i think the snow will make things work especially with the travel disturbances. chicago looking at 1 degrees. moving over to the european continent. still gusty conditions and unstable weather. wet also. some heavy rain could target the regions that the flooding situations not alleviated yet. across the south central and the mid mediterranean regions very unstable conditions. hail, damaging winds and also heavy rain is on tap. here is your extended forecast. >>> opposition activists in syria say government
. >> rose: do they have two different views of america that they are appealing to? >> in this last moment they are both appealing to the last little undecideds. and so governor romney is making this case. he's basically saying you go with president obama, it's more of the same. >> rose: more years of what happened and are you not happy with what happened. >> exactly. and go with me and i have a plan. in his closing argument he goes through his five, he's even given some of his items, name, the names of the bills that he would enact. and the president is saying i'm not done yet. he says you know, i'm to the going to give up that fight. and then he goes in his closing argue speech he talks about various people. and he said they need a champion. so he is running as the champion for the middle class. and that is both a message to the base but it's also to those undecided voters. >> rose: romney is running as a champion of woman. >> romney is running as a champion of everyone, he says. and of course that is to deal with the lingering problems from that surreptitiously taped 47%. but he is sayi
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